Club Directory: Publications

Photo by Sam Lee

DENEBOLA

What does your club do?

Denebola is Newton South’s online newspaper, so we work to provide people both inside the school and out with relevant, entertaining content that helps to cultivate a sense of community by highlighting the notable people, events, and topics in our midst. All of the publications at South are great, but the online setup really allows us to get right in the middle of the action as it’s happening, and to put up content in a variety of ways, including podcasts, videos, photos, and even memes.

What kind of person would enjoy this club?

The beautiful thing about Denebola is that we put out such diverse content, so there really is something for everyone. Even if you’re not a writer, we’re always looking for photographers, graphic designers, or even just people who are willing to be interviewed. Whatever you’re passionate about, whatever you love talking about, we want to hear it.

What has been the best thing about being a part of this club, in your experience?

Getting the chance to express my ideas and state my case on different issues to such a wide audience has definitely made me more conscientious of my own and other people’s perceptions of the world. It’s so rewarding to be able to foster interesting conversation and to work to ensure that everyone’s voice is heard. There’s also nothing that compares to the look on someone’s face when you show them that an article about them pursuing their passion has gotten hundreds of views.

LEO MAGAZINE

What does your club do?

We are an online literary magazine that publishes nonfiction and some fictional essays that try to spark conversation and innovative thinking within the South community and beyond.

What kind of person would enjoy this club?

Leo invites anybody who feels like they have something to say but maybe feels like their voice wouldn’t be welcomed elsewhere– in a classroom, for example. Another issue we feel is vital to our publication is quality writing: we want to publish work that will be taken seriously and inspire others to think in new ways, so if you want to work on your writing skills, Leo is the place to go! That said, we also value our visual artists, our tech people, and our communications staff.

What has been the best thing about being a part of this club, in your experience?

Although Leo has had a reputation of not ever publishing anything, what’s made me come back to meetings every time is the promise for deep conversations. I love that when we discuss people’s writing or potential future topics to talk about, I always learn something new– either about a specific topic, about the writer, about other members’ viewpoints. Leo really is a motley crowd, and it’s great hearing perspectives that perhaps I wouldn’t hear in my daily life.

LION’S ROAR

What does your club do? 

The Lion’s Roar is the only student-run print newspaper at South. We publish eight issues per school year and go on an annual National Scholastic Press Association conference (NSPA) and NESPA trip with JEA. Every year, we have fun creating the paper through writing, designs, photography, graphics and reporting.

What kind of person would enjoy this club?

The Roar is a great place for anyone who wants to voice their opinion, investigate the news, write about stories, make designs, take photos, and create graphics. Someone with an interest in writing, design, and leadership would suit the Roar environment. Everyone is friendly and open to brand new ideas!

What has been the best thing about being part of this club, in your experience?

The best experience about being part of this club is either NSPA or creating the paper during paste-up. NSPA is the ultimate bonding and learning event. While we are there to learn more about journalism, it’s also an amazing experience to get to know your staff. After NSPA, we are able to create our best issue of the volume. Our staff gets together for five hours each day for two weeks and collaborate, write, and edit. While tiring and somewhat stressful, the process is always fun. The most rewarding part is seeing the paper in print on paper day. All the work is worth it.

REFLECTIONS

What does your club do?

Reflections is a place where kids who dig art and writing come together to appreciate it. We constantly receive student submissions, review and discuss them all, and then at the end of the year compile the best ones into a magazine. Our goal is to encourage and celebrate student creativity by publishing their work for the rest of the student body to appreciate. Although reading poetry in class or seeing artwork in a museum is pretty cool, it’s 10 times better when you know it’s been created by someone you go to school with. The submissions we receive are obviously crafted with care and are very personal, and I always feel lucky to be able to see them. Not many people are outward writers or artists, so Reflections tries to represent them by showing how much creativity there is at South.

What kind of person would enjoy this club?

I’d like to say people who enjoy reading creative writing and looking at art, but since I didn’t really like poetry too much before I joined, I’m going to widen the spectrum to include curious or analytical students. Sometimes we get submissions that, on the surface, don’t seem like much, but once we’re through cracking it open with analysis and debate, everyone seems to appreciate that piece much more. Anyone can learn to like what we do just so long as they’re open-minded and willing to hear others out.

What has been the best thing about being a part of this club, in your experience?

Well, for one thing, it made me appreciate poetry much, much more. The difference between reading a poem written by some old guy in the Middle Ages and a peer is that one is far more relatable and easier to appreciate. As I said before, it’s really special to read a really heartfelt piece of writing that a student submitted anonymously. Also, being in Reflections has taught me that some people really do enjoy having long discussions and deliberations about art and writing. The analysis we do gets pretty deep. I know from experience that most people don’t get too excited about English class, so I think it’s pretty cool that students choose to congregate in their free time and hold in-depth analytical discussions. Also, I got to meet a lot of really cool people from different grades, and our ages didn’t really rank us or affect our intellectual contributions to a discussion. Everyone shares the same love of the arts and willingness to dig deep and find meaning that it connects us in a really touching way. I’ve made some really great friends from this club, and I feel like we know each other better because of all the debating we’ve done over art and writing. We’re a family, and weirdly enough, the issue at the end of each year is like our child. It makes me really happy to see students at school get hyped over the newly-released issue, even if they aren’t part of Reflections itself. So many kids at South appreciate the arts that the actual size of Reflections (which is pretty small) doesn’t matter much. In fact, it’s nicer if we’re small, because then we get to know each other much more intimately and become a tight-knit bunch.

REGULUS (YEARBOOK)

What does your club do?

Our club makes the yearbook for South.

What kind of person would enjoy this club?

Anyone who enjoys taking pictures, design, writing, or business.

What has been the best thing about being a part of this club, in your experience?

I have made so many friends that are awesome people through Regulus. Also, everyone loves what they do for the club, and therefore the book comes out amazing every year, so it’s cool to be around people who are dedicated to something you love as well.
For more information about when and where all of these clubs meet, click here.

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